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Home > 8 Malignant disease and immunosuppression > 8.1 Cytotoxic drugs > 8.1.5 Other antineoplastic drugs > Everolimus and sunitinib for treating unresectable or metastatic neuroendocrine tumours in people with progressive disease - NICE TAG TA449

Everolimus and sunitinib for treating unresectable or metastatic neuroendocrine tumours in people with progressive disease - NICE TAG TA449

1.1Everolimus and sunitinib are recommended, within their marketing authorisations, as options for treating well- or moderately differentiated unresectable or metastatic neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) of pancreatic origin in adults with progressive disease.

1.2Everolimus is recommended, within its marketing authorisation, as an option for treating well-differentiated (grade 1 or grade 2) non-functional unresectable or metastatic NETs of gastrointestinal or lung origin in adults with progressive disease.

1.3Everolimus is recommended only when the company provides it with the discount agreed in the patient access scheme.

Why the committee made these recommendations

NETs can affect the pancreas, gastrointestinal tissue and lungs and are difficult to diagnose and treat. They can significantly affect emotional health and often mean that people are unable to work. There is particularly high unmet need for people with NETs that affect the lungs.

Clinical trial evidence shows that everolimus and sunitinib are effective for treating pancreatic NETs compared with current treatment (best supportive care). Everolimus is effective for treating gastrointestinal and lung NETs compared with current treatment (best supportive care).

For treating pancreatic NETs, everolimus and sunitinib were recommended because they met NICE's end-of-life criteria. The cost effectiveness estimates varied, from below £20,000 up to £30,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained.

For treating gastrointestinal NETs, everolimus did not meet the end-of-life criteria but was recommended because it is cost effective, at below £20,000 per QALY gained.

For treating lung NETs, everolimus did not meet the end-of-life criteria. The cost-effectiveness estimates for everolimus varied, from below £20,000 up to £30,000 per QALY gained. It was recommended because of the cost-effectiveness estimates and the limited treatment options available for people with lung NETs.

NICE's end-of-life criteria are that life expectancy for people with the condition should be less than 24 months and that treatment should extend life by more than 3 months.

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ta449

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